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Pre Exposure Prophylaxis

It is the term for using HIV drugs before exposure to reduce the chance of getting HIV. This is usually daily by someone who is HIV negative, to reduce their chance of catching HIV. PrEP uses two HIV drugs (tenofovir and FTC) in one pill (called Truvada) before (and after) exposure.

 

PrEP = Pre Exposure Prophylaxis. It is the term for using HIV drugs before exposure to reduce the chance of getting HIV. This is usually daily by someone who is HIV negative, to reduce their chance of catching HIV. PrEP uses two HIV drugs (tenofovir and FTC) in one pill (called Truvada) before (and after) exposure

 

PrEP can be prescribed only by a health care provider, so talk to yours to find out if PrEP is the right HIV prevention strategy for you. You must take PrEP daily for it to work. Also, you must take an HIV test before beginning PrEP to be sure you don’t already have HIV and every 3 months while you’re taking it, so you’ll have to visit your health care provider for regular follow-ups.
The cost of PrEP is covered by many health insurance plans, and a commercial medication assistance program<http://www.gilead.com/responsibility/us-patient-access/truvada%20for%20prep%20medication%20assistance%20program> provides free PrEP to people with limited income and no insurance to cover PrEP care. We at Bliss Cares we help you access the PrEP medication and the labs require by the CDC guidelines.

Those that qualified for PrEP are  those at very high risk for HIV, PrEP can significantly reduce your risk of HIV infection if taken daily.  Daily PrEP use can lower the risk of getting HIV from sex by more than 92% and from injection drug use by more than 70%. You can combine additional strategies with PrEP to reduce your risk even further.

 

PrEP can cause side effects like nausea in some people, but these generally subside over time. No serious side effects have been observed, and these side effects aren’t life threatening. If you are taking PrEP, tell your health care provider about any side effects that are severe or do not go away.
No, you should not stop using condoms because you are taking PrEP. PrEP doesn’t give you any protection against other STDs, like gonorrhea and chlamydia. Also, while PrEP can significantly reduce your risk of HIV infection if taken daily, you can combine additional strategies like condom use with PrEP to reduce your risk even further.

 

If used the right way every time you have sex, condoms are highly effective in preventing HIV and some STDs you can get through body fluids, like gonorrhea and chlamydia. However, they provide less protection against STDs spread through skin-to-skin contact, like human papillomavirus or HPV (genital warts), genital herpes, and syphilis. Use condoms correctly.

 

You must take PrEP daily for it to work. But there are several reasons people stop taking PrEP. For example,
·        If your risk of getting HIV infection becomes low because of changes in your life, you may want to stop taking PrEP.
·        If you find you don’t want to take a pill every day or often forget to take your pills, other ways of protecting yourself from HIV infection may work better for you.
·        If you have side effects from the medicine that are interfering with your life, or if blood tests show that your body is reacting to PrEP in unsafe ways, your provider may stop prescribing PrEP for you.

 

When taken every day, PrEP is safe and highly effective in preventing HIV infection. PrEP reaches maximum protection from HIV for receptive anal sex at about 7 days of daily use. For all other activities, including insertive anal sex, vaginal sex, and injection drug use, PrEP reaches maximum protection at about 20 days of daily use

 

In people who are HIV-negative and have taken PrEP for up to 5 years, no significant health effects have been seen PrEP (pre-exposure prophylaxis) is only for people who are at ongoing very high risk of HIV infection. But PEP (post-exposure prophylaxis) is an option for someone who thinks they’ve recently been exposed to HIV during sex or through sharing needles and works to prepare drugs.

 

PEP means taking antiretroviral medicines after a potential exposure to HIV to prevent becoming infected. PEP must be started within 72 hours of possible exposure to HIV. If you’re prescribed PEP, you’ll need to take it once or twice daily for 28 days. See our PEP

 

For more information, please contact us at (407) 203-5984 or visit the following resources:

Q&As (http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/basics/pep.html) or (http://www.whatisprep.org/) and see video: (https://vimeo.com/79717700)

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